27 May

The Internet: A Web of Possibilities

Disclosure: I am the Community Manager for GenJuice with the responsibility of promoting the upcoming #GenJuiceTour.  Use the following coupon code to receive 30% off the normal ticket price: “KeithP”.

I am sitting at my old desk, in my parents’ house, reminiscing about my high school career.  I sit here with a much heavier workload and a significantly stronger drive for success.  No longer am I motivated by Ms. Hampson’s opinion of my English paper, nor Mrs. Fiordilino’s criticism of my Italian accent.  Now I fuel my own drive.  It is these ambitions that have led me to a particularly unique set of innovative individuals: GenJuice.

GenJuice is a national tour of Gen Y innovation and entrepreneurship events.  In each city, the GenJuice team will hold “unconferences” for approximately 75-100 attendees all between the ages of 17 – 29.  At these unconferences, attendees will get a fun introductory performance from local artists, hear a keynote speech from a successful entrepreneur and lead/contribute to attendee-led discussions.

I have officially begun working for this amazing organization as Community Manager.  It is my hope to utilize various social media outlets, such as Twitter, Facebook, GenJuice’s already established V-Blog and web space, as well as various other social media tools to increase awareness, encourage conversation before, during and after an event, and most importantly drive attendance.  Tickets are on sale through EventBrite for a mere $15.  This is a unique networking opportunity for all individuals interested in marketing, social media, entrepreneurship, start-ups, technology and current trends (think Mashable).

The tour launches in just over 3 weeks from today!  The following is a list of cities with planned “unconferences”: San Francisco, PortlandSeattle, Chicago, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Atlanta, Austin, Phoenix, San Diego and Los Angeles.  All event dates and details can be found on the GenJuice site: www.GenJuice.com

Hope to see you there!


  • So what’s the end goal of GenJuice? What’s the value proposition?

    My impression (briefly grabbed from the web site) is that it’s a “networking drive” to connect “young entrepreneurs” (how were they selected – or not? Are you hoping to “find” them, e.g. that they turn up?).

    In theory, it’s a good idea: people across the country may face differing levels of support from peers and their local business community. In practice, I suspect it’s all in the execution.

    From a personal standpoint, it’s obviously a very good way (for you) to meet a bunch of (other) entrepreneurs/self-employed people, and also to engage local businesses or people (e.g. angels) who are interested in supporting such entrepreneurs.

    Also, why are they called “unconferences”? Because (i) they’re cheap, and (ii) people don’t travel across the country for them? Seems curious.

  • So what’s the end goal of GenJuice? What’s the value proposition?

    My impression (briefly grabbed from the web site) is that it’s a “networking drive” to connect “young entrepreneurs” (how were they selected – or not? Are you hoping to “find” them, e.g. that they turn up?).

    In theory, it’s a good idea: people across the country may face differing levels of support from peers and their local business community. In practice, I suspect it’s all in the execution.

    From a personal standpoint, it’s obviously a very good way (for you) to meet a bunch of (other) entrepreneurs/self-employed people, and also to engage local businesses or people (e.g. angels) who are interested in supporting such entrepreneurs.

    Also, why are they called “unconferences”? Because (i) they’re cheap, and (ii) people don’t travel across the country for them? Seems curious.

  • So what’s the end goal of GenJuice? What’s the value proposition?

    My impression (briefly grabbed from the web site) is that it’s a “networking drive” to connect “young entrepreneurs” (how were they selected – or not? Are you hoping to “find” them, e.g. that they turn up?).

    In theory, it’s a good idea: people across the country may face differing levels of support from peers and their local business community. In practice, I suspect it’s all in the execution.

    From a personal standpoint, it’s obviously a very good way (for you) to meet a bunch of (other) entrepreneurs/self-employed people, and also to engage local businesses or people (e.g. angels) who are interested in supporting such entrepreneurs.

    Also, why are they called “unconferences”? Because (i) they’re cheap, and (ii) people don’t travel across the country for them? Seems curious.